Interagency Ecological Program: Fish catch and water quality data from the Sacramento River floodplain and tidal slough, collected by the Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring Program, 1998-2018.

Interagency Ecological Program (IEP), B. Schreier, B. Davis, N. Ikemiyagi. 2018. Interagency Ecological Program: Fish catch and water quality data from the Sacramento River floodplain and tidal slough, collected by the Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring Program, 1998-2018. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/0ab359bec7b752c1f68621f5e1768eb0.

Featured photo: The rotary screw trap in the Toe drain canal of the Yolo Bypass floodplain.

Largely supported by the Interagency Ecological Program (IEP), California Department of Water Resources (DWR) has operated a fisheries monitoring program in the Yolo Bypass, a seasonal floodplain and tidal slough, since 1998. The objectives of the Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring Program (YBFMP) are to: (1) collect baseline data on lower trophic levels (phytoplankton, zooplankton, and aquatic insects), juvenile fish and adult fish, hydrology, and water quality parameters; 2) investigation of the temporal and seasonal patterns in chlorophyll-a concentrations, including whether high concentrations are exported from the Bypass during agricultural and natural flow events and the possibility of manipulating bypass flows to benefit listed species like Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). The YBFMP operates a rotary screw trap and fyke trap, and conducts biweekly beach seine and lower trophic surveys in addition to maintaining water quality instrumentation in the bypass. The YBFMP serves to fill information gaps regarding environmental conditions in the bypass that trigger migrations and enhanced survival and growth of native fishes, as well as provide data for IEP synthesis efforts. YBFMP staff also conduct analyses of our monitoring data to address pertinent management related questions as identified by IEP.

Yolo Bypass Native fishes
A graphical summary of native species caught in the Yolo Bypass since 1998. Each sampling gear type is operated at given times throughout each year targeting migrating species, different life-stages of fishes, and habitats. The first panel (A) describes the size distribution of fishes caught in each gear type. Beach seines (B) sample small fishes living on the shoal and benthic habitats. The rotary screw trap (C) typically operated January to June, samples out-migrating juvenile fishes including Chinook Salmon, and Sacramento Splittail. Lastly, the fyke trap is operated from October to June each year sampling large fishes and species that migrate up the watershed for spawning. Most notable is a correlation between water year and native fish abundance demonstrated in the rotary screw trap catch. Native species catch was greatest in the Yolo Bypass during wet years of 1998, 2006, 2011, and 2017 whereas low catch is correlated with dry years.

 

Dcp_2577_crop
Juvenile Chinook salmon captured on the Yolo Bypass floodplain.

The Yolo Bypass has been identified as a high restoration priority by the National Marine Fisheries Service and US Fish and Wildlife Service Biological Opinions for Delta Smelt, Winter and Spring-run Chinook salmon and by California EcoRestore. The YBFMP informs the restoration actions that are mandated or recommended in these plans, and provides critical baseline data on the ecology of the bypass and how it interacts with the broader San Francisco Estuary. Only juvenile and adult fish catch with associated water quality are presented in this dataset.

 

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Recommended citation for this data package

Interagency Ecological Program (IEP), B. Schreier, B. Davis, N. Ikemiyagi. 2018. Interagency Ecological Program: Fish catch and water quality data from the Sacramento River floodplain and tidal slough, collected by the Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring Program, 1998-2018. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/0ab359bec7b752c1f68621f5e1768eb0. Dataset accessed 10/10/2018.

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