Plot-level field data and model simulation results from summer 2017 sampling of 2016 short-interval fires in Greater Yellowstone

Turner M. G., K. H. Braziunas, W. D. Hansen, B. J. Harvey. 2019. Plot-level field data and model simulation results, archived to accompany Turner et al. manuscript; reports data from summer 2017 sampling of short-interval fires that burned during summer 2016 in Greater Yellowstone. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/a1b7791376a04ce8c6ea9043547bb6af.

Featured photo: View across the burn mosaic produced after the 2016 Maple Fire burned through young lodgepole pines that had regenerated after the 1988 North Fork Fire in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Historically, fires burned at 100- to 300-yr intervals in this landscape. Fires that reburn young forests (here, after only 28 years) are projected to become more likely in the future as climate warms. Photo by M. G. Turner.

This data package is archived to accompany the paper by Turner et al. (2019).

 

Jacob,Monica_sampling_BerryGlade
Jacob Gold and Monica Turner recording data where the 2016 Berry Fire reburned young lodgepole pines that had regenerated after the 2000 Glade Fire; the area shown here was a servere surface fire that killed but did not consume the young trees. (Photo by Deirdre Turner, July 2017)

Subalpine forests in the northern Rocky Mountains have been resilient to stand-replacing fires that historically burned at 100–300-yr intervals. Fire intervals are projected to decline drastically as climate warms, and forests that reburn before recovering from previous fire may lose their ability to rebound. We studied recent fires in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA) and asked whether short-interval (less than 30 yrs) stand-replacing fires can erode lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) forest resilience via increased burn severity, reduced early postfire tree regeneration, reduced carbon stocks, and slower carbon recovery. During 2016, fires reburned young lodgepole pine forests that regenerated after wildfires in 1988 and 2000. During 2017, we sampled 0.25-ha plots in stand-replacing reburns (n=18) and nearby young forests that did not reburn (n=9). We also simulated stand development with and without reburns to assess carbon recovery trajectories.

Kristin_data_BerryGladeJPG
Kristin Braziunas recording data in an area of high-severity fire within the 2016 Berry Fire. Tall trees in the background were survivors of the 2000 Glade Fire. Most of the small young pines that had regenerated after the Glade Fire were combusted at this site. (Photo by Monica Turner, July 2017)

Recommended citation for this data package

Turner M. G., K. H. Braziunas, W. D. Hansen, B. J. Harvey. 2019. Plot-level field data and model simulation results, archived to accompany Turner et al. manuscript; reports data from summer 2017 sampling of short-interval fires that burned during summer 2016 in Greater Yellowstone. Environmental Data Initiative. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/a1b7791376a04ce8c6ea9043547bb6af. Dataset accessed 5/21/2019.

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